Don’t burn it down…

When you decide to jump ship…

So you’ve decided to quit. Maybe for more money, work-life balance, family, career change, etc. but your next step shows who you are a person to your old employer and yourself. I get it, don’t think if someone offered me seven figures and a basket of puppies that I wouldn’t fly to wherever they needed me.

Give your two weeks, even if you know they may let you go right away. Don’t sit in your seat with a very big secret. Your company will also find out where you went to, even before LinkedIn, people talked. Do not give them something to talk about.

Don’t be a dick about it. Whomever you report to will respect you more if you’re straight up and honest. (If your company ends up countering, that’s a win-win!) Just tell them that you received an offer and you think it would be a great opportunity, yeah they may try to talk you out of it, but listen politely and still submit your two weeks.

If you don’t have two weeks. Still, talk to the person you report to but also explain you want to give them two weeks as is custom but that’s not an option for this opportunity. (If moving is involved you may need to cut your time shorter than expected)

DO NOT become a YouTube sensation with balls to the walls, you all suck meltdown. This will not work out for you. Remember how I said people talk? If you are staying in the same industry, there is a very good chance you are 3 degrees away from your new boss without even knowing it. Isn’t that how LinkedIn got so successful in the first place?

DO NOT wipe your laptop and walk out. Could you be more suspicious? Also if you think most companies still can’t retrieve some of that data after a “free downloadable” wiping service…. sorry where was I, I was laughing too hard.

Lastly, you never know where you will end up in the future. You may end up at a company that does business with your ex-company, you may hate your new job and wish to come back (The grass isn’t always greener), or even you may need a reference in the future.

Don’t set the bridge on fire.

 

Image result for dilbert quitting

“Cold Calls”

Why I don’t believe in cold calls…

Before my fellow sales professionals jump down my throat, please allow me to explain. I don’t believe in TRADITIONAL 1950’s cold calling that still goes on today.

“Hey, Bob, bobby, bob-man! This is Fred, I’m from so-and-so, LLC wanted to hit you up about my services…”

First of all, Bob already hates you.  Second, do your F-ing research!!!

It’s the year 2017, picture the world with computers in our pockets, endless information about publically traded companies and a pretty good amount of private companies on the internet to assist your calls. One step further, the person you wish to connect with probably has a LinkedIn, this profile tells a story, where they came from, interests, it may give away their DiSC (you’ve seen this corporate training right?). Endless amounts of info at your disposal to assist you in your connection.

Networking is great because you get pieces of people at these events and this assists you in your calls. The internet can do the same. Information is out there for the taking, that’s the whole point of LinkedIn. Of course, don’t start a call with “I love pineapple upside down cake too!” (Maybe this could work for a bakery, depending on what your service is.) With that being said if you sell recruiting services and Glassdoor has poor reviews of the company, this could also be your way in. You should be there to assist and help solve a problem, build a lasting relationship.

By all means, if you are in a pyramid scheme please keep cold calling, real sales professionals are judging you anyway, and you make us look better. For the real professionals, it’s time to come into the 21st century. There’s no reason we are still making blind calls, but it happens every day. It also may be why you aren’t successful.

Some companies still have outcall requirements… So Fred gets to keep his job because he gets hung up on 50 times a day but Megan gets her hand slapped (metaphorically) because she had 5 calls, but were all an hour long and is in the process of closing 3 contracts. Which is better for your business?