Don’t burn it down…

When you decide to jump ship…

So you’ve decided to quit. Maybe for more money, work-life balance, family, career change, etc. but your next step shows who you are a person to your old employer and yourself. I get it, don’t think if someone offered me seven figures and a basket of puppies that I wouldn’t fly to wherever they needed me.

Give your two weeks, even if you know they may let you go right away. Don’t sit in your seat with a very big secret. Your company will also find out where you went to, even before LinkedIn, people talked. Do not give them something to talk about.

Don’t be a dick about it. Whomever you report to will respect you more if you’re straight up and honest. (If your company ends up countering, that’s a win-win!) Just tell them that you received an offer and you think it would be a great opportunity, yeah they may try to talk you out of it, but listen politely and still submit your two weeks.

If you don’t have two weeks. Still, talk to the person you report to but also explain you want to give them two weeks as is custom but that’s not an option for this opportunity. (If moving is involved you may need to cut your time shorter than expected)

DO NOT become a YouTube sensation with balls to the walls, you all suck meltdown. This will not work out for you. Remember how I said people talk? If you are staying in the same industry, there is a very good chance you are 3 degrees away from your new boss without even knowing it. Isn’t that how LinkedIn got so successful in the first place?

DO NOT wipe your laptop and walk out. Could you be more suspicious? Also if you think most companies still can’t retrieve some of that data after a “free downloadable” wiping service…. sorry where was I, I was laughing too hard.

Lastly, you never know where you will end up in the future. You may end up at a company that does business with your ex-company, you may hate your new job and wish to come back (The grass isn’t always greener), or even you may need a reference in the future.

Don’t set the bridge on fire.

 

Image result for dilbert quitting

AWS

The release of the Technostress post couldn’t have been timed better if I had tried. (I swear I didn’t take downAmazon)

If you don’t know what’s going on check out TechCrunch first: https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/28/amazon-aws-s3-outage-is-breaking-things-for-a-lot-of-websites-and-apps/

Although the exact cause has not been released the error is clearly coming out of one of Amazon’s server farms taking down the East Coast. I tell my customers Hardware before Software. Crazy idea, I know, in the era of apps and everything you could ever know at your fingertips, the software will not fix a hardware issue. The software can assist in load balances to a point, but servers are strained every day depending on what you are running.

For years the technology industry has gone crazy over “cloud”. The cloud isn’t a cloud and a horrible term but highly marketable. Your information is just hosted somewhere else and the host gets to bill you per license. Hooray for overcharging! Honestly, it isn’t that bad of a system for small companies getting off the ground but these have been marketed as a long-term solution. If you depend on your own server(s) you could still go down, but Amazon currently has most of the East Coast down; overpromising and under delivering. Most server farms have a failover plan. If a server goes down it will disconnect and go to the backup server. This brings me back to my point. This is the reason why server farms exist. Load balancing and backup failover precautions cost money upfront. Take whatever technology quote you have and immediately multiply it by two. $$$$$

Amazon is one of the biggest customers for cloud as a service. When something like this happens to the largest supplier it will most likely disrupt the market. I’ll be watching this intently to see what the cause was and what marketing spin comes out of this.

As for any of you using AWS, take some vitamin D, mediate, and hope your cortisol levels don’t get too bad. (See the previous post)

Technostress

What really happens to your body during technostress? I’m going to briefly tell you about a study done in 2012 in Australia and then pull some conclusions.

  • 20 male students participated
  • 10 in the experimental group
  • 10 in the control group
  • each participant chewed a cotton ball before and after the study to measure the cortisol levels in the body

Each participant was told to put items in a shopping cart online. (Simple enough task) Nothing happened to the control group after two minutes they were told they were done and could be on their way. The experimental group was given an error message preventing them from their task two minutes in. Researchers told the group there was an error and apologized.

The experimental group showed an increased level cortisol. Even after such a mundane task with no real urgency.

The stress hormone, cortisol, is public health enemy number one. Scientists have known for years that elevated cortisol levels: interfere with learning and memory, lower immune function and bone density, increase weight gain, blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease… The list goes on and on.

How many times have you been at the office or in a hotel and your internet goes out? Dropped call? (I really can’t hear you right now) Tried to send an email but the file size was too large? The list can go on.

Every time this happens cortisol goes to work, trying to balance out your stress level. Maybe you were talking to a client or had to get your homework emailed in by a certain time/date. Take for instance you are using old equipment at school or work and these types of occurrences happen on a regular basis. Cortisol levels will stay elevated, you may become sicker after being exposed to a cold, your memory may not be as good, and of course the stress on your heart and body in general.

Technostress is real and can be measured, more companies should take these studies into consideration when putting off a system upgrade or software roll-out without proper training. We are only doing ourselves a disservice continuing the way we are.

What is the biggest technostress you deal with? How could it be addressed and by whom?

References:

Riedl, R., Kindermann, H., Auinger, A., & Javor, A. (2012). Technostress from a Neurobiological Perspective. Business & Information Systems Engineering, 4(2), 61-69.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201301/cortisol-why-the-stress-hormone-is-public-enemy-no-1

 

Technostress

Stay tuned for tomorrow when I discuss technostress and a great physiological study from 2012.

“Michelle Weil and Larry Rosen, who defined it (technostress) as ‘any negative impact on attitudes, thoughts, behaviors, or body physiology that is caused either directly or indirectly by technology.’” (Riedl, R., Kindermann, H., Auinger, A., & Javor, A, 2012, p.61-62)